By Stuart Kaufman

After leaving the practice of law, I joined a company that re-developed surplus or under-utilized corporate property. On the first day of my new career, my new boss, an amazingly creative genius named Howard P. Hoffman, called me into his office to give me the “rules of the road.” He told me that what I was about to do was as different from practicing law as brain surgery is from sitting in a tree. He said that if something turned out wrong as a result of something I did, there would be no adverse ramifications from him, but that if something went wrong because I didn’t do something, I would be out the door so fast that my eyes would cross and my ears would ring. His absolute rule was “when in doubt, do something.” This was a lesson that I took to heart, not only in my professional career, but in every aspect of my life.

By Stuart Kaufman

Edmund Burke is one of my all time heroes. He was an 18th-century statesman and philosopher who, among other things, championed the cause of the American Revolution; he is also frequently called “the father of modern conservatism.” I try to live my life according to Burke’s most famous aphorism:

By Stuart Kaufman

My father, Morris Kaufman, died on the fourth day of Chanukah in 1992. In 2016, his yahrtzeit (the anniversary of his death) will have occurred on December 27 and on that day, I will have recited the kaddish (the memorial prayer for the dead). My thoughts are filled with him and I decided to write this not because he was unique, but because so many fathers, like mine, are the North Stars, the beacons of guidance in their children’s lives, even long after they are gone.

By Lachlan McIntosh

The United States is truly entering uncharted waters as President-elect Donald Trump prepares to take office and become the nation’s 45th president. Daily, Trump says or tweets something that would be unimaginable coming from any other person to ever hold the office. As this thin-skinned, Putin-defending, volatile demagogue prepares to lead the greatest country on earth, it seems appropriate to reflect on the record of his predecessor, Barack Obama.

By Lachlan McIntosh

Democrats are licking their wounds after losing the 2016 presidential campaign to Donald Trump. Sure, Hillary Clinton got the most votes. Her margin is wide enough that there wouldn’t even be a recount required. Clinton’s margin is some four times larger than Richard Nixon’s 1968 victory over Hubert Humphrey. But for some reason that’s not how we elect presidents here and the Clinton campaign knew the rules going in. Their arrogance and elitism cost them what should have been an easy one.

Mercury newspaper racks are located at the following locations:

The Meeting Street Inn

Clair's Service Station at 334 Folly Rd.

Harris Teeter on Houston-Northcutt Blvd.

The Square Onion in I'On

Mt. Pleasant Library on Mathis Ferry Rd.